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1265 Bumble Bee Rd
Accident, MD, 21520
United States

301-387-7729

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Stories from HART

Are You Introducing a New Pet to Your Family?

Sarah Myers

Adding a pet to your family is a big responsibility, but can be incredibly rewarding.

There's a long list of health benefits of having a pet, and it teaches your kids how to care for something else. Like any new member of your family though, Dr. Jessy wants to ensure that you introduce your new pet the right way.

Make sure to keep the following things in mind to make a smooth transition

Introducing a New Pet to Kids

There are things we take for granted as adults that kids don't understand. Here's how to make sure your kids and your new pet begin bonding from the start.

1. Steer Clear of Surprises

We've all seen those videos online of parents surprising their kids with a new puppy. As cute as it can be when those surprises go right, they can also go terribly wrong.

Kids tend to screech and yell when they're excited and surprised. Those sudden loud noises are understandably scary for a new pet. You run the risk of the fear created becoming defensive and even leading to a bite.

Simply surprise your kids with the news of their new dog or cat instead so they are calm when they meet their new friend.

2. Have a Training Session

Kids are still building their motor skills and they often don't know their own strength. To teach them how to be gentle and how to treat a pet kindly, Dr. Jessy recommends using stuffed animals for "training." 

Kids should be taught to refrain from disturbing their pets when they are resting or sleeping, handling them roughly, screaming or shouting at them, getting too close to the pet’s face, hugging the pet or trying to take their toys or food.

The younger your kids are, the less developed their motor skills are and the more important this training is as a first step.

3. Set Up the Approach

When it's time for your kids to meet their new furry friend, be careful about the way they are introduced. An adult should have the pet on lead and let the pet observe the kids first. Kids should be sitting on the floor quietly and calmly with several treats in their hands. The kids should take turns saying the pet’s name and tossing a treat in the pet’s direction as the pet moves closer to the children.

This method gives the pet the choice of how close to approach which is determined by the pet’s comfort level.

Also, be sure everyone avoids approaching a pet from behind until the pet is comfortable in his or her new home.

4. Love the Leash

When you're bringing a new dog into the family, a leash is your best friend. The leash gives you a way to control the dog in case they exhibit an unwanted behavior; i.e. pick up an item they shouldn’t have, try to chase a running kid, decide to check out the trash, etc.  And, the truth is, you’re not sure how a new dog will react with your family.

Some people skip the leash because they plan to hold the dog, but this isn't recommended. A dog can squirm out of your arms in an instant, and you don't want to put your own safety or that of your family at risk. A leash is the only way to go.

Building Your Family Four Legs at a Time

Every family who gets a pet can’t wait until the pet and the kids are best friends, playing in the yard or cuddling together. But, don't assume that will happen on day one. The tips above can help you arrange a peaceful, successful start to your growing family's bond.

If you’re not adopting from us here at HART, be sure to bring your pet to see Dr. Jessy to make sure your new pet is in good health and his or her vaccines are up-to-date.

Call our office for your new pet's first appointment.

“FEAR FREE” CARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR PETS AT HART

Paula Yudelevit

HART staff earns certifications to ease pets’ fear, anxiety during visits

 Can you imagine telling your dog, “Let’s go to the vet!” and seeing her tail wag? How about getting out your cat’s carrier and seeing him come running?

 Pet owners won’t need to imagine it when they visit the HART Animal Center in Accident, Maryland. The Director of the Bredel Clinic, Dr. Jessy Vandevender, and her staff, and the department managers and supervisors in the Adoption Wing, Bed ‘n Bark Inn and MuttWorks Grooming, are all part of a new initiative in veterinary medicine designed to ease the stress, fear, and anxiety so many pets experience while at the veterinarian.

 Known as “Fear Free,” the training and certification program help veterinarians and animal care-givers modify their procedures, handling, and facilities to help pets feel safe and comfortable while receiving the medical care they need.

 The “Fear Free” initiative aims to “take the ‘pet’ out of ‘petrified’” and get pets back for veterinary visits by promoting considerate approach and gentle control techniques used in calming environments. Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to reduction or removal of anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved including pets, their owners, and veterinary health care teams.

 “I saw how fearful many dogs and cats can be when visiting a veterinarian clinic or boarding facility,” says Dr. Jessy. “Many of these pets have bad experiences and owners are reluctant to bring them for care or to leave them for an extended stay. With this training, our staff at HART can help alleviate the stress and anxiety and create a happier visit for pets and their owners. The adoptable animals in the Adoption Wing are also happier because of the training the staff received.”

Founded by veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker, the Fear Free Certification Program was developed by board-certified veterinary behaviorists, veterinary technician behavior specialists, board-certified veterinary anesthetists, well-known veterinary practice management experts, and board-certified veterinary practitioners experienced in Fear Free methods.

“Providing veterinarians with the tools they need to ease this burden of fear and anxiety for our patients is the pinnacle of my 37-year veterinary career,” said Dr. Becker, who was dubbed “America’s Veterinarian” by Dr. Oz and appeared on Good Morning America for 17 years. “Veterinary professionals are hungry for this information. Animals and their humans need and deserve it. And now it’s here!”

 To become certified, those participating in the program are required to complete a comprehensive, 8-part educational course and exam. They also have to take continuing education to remain certified.

 The HART staff who have completed and are certified in the “Fear Free” course are Bredel Clinic staff: Dr. Jessy Vandevender, Veterinarian Technician, Stacey Hershman, Veterinarian Assistants, Sarah Maust and Courtney Lowery; Adoption Wing staff: Adoption Manager and Behaviorist Debbie Snyder, Adoption Wing and Rescue & Transport Manager Caroline Robison, and Supervisors, Kelsey VanSickle and Ashley Diehl, and Adoption Coordinator, Janessa Beitzel; Bed ‘n Bark Inn staff: Manager, Rachel Dudok and Supervisors, Kerri Sanders and Megan Sherbin; and groomer, Heather Umbel.

 Pet owners who would like their pets to experience the “Fear Free” difference can schedule an appointment at the Bredel Clinic, or MuttWorks, make a reservation at the Bed ‘n Bark Inn, or visit our adoptable animals, by calling 301.387.7729.

From Top:

Adoption Wing: Heather Umbel (MuttWorks Grooming), Janessa Beitzel, Caroline Robison, Kelsey VanSickle, Ashley Diehl, Debbie Snyder

Bed ‘n Bark Inn: Megan Sherbin, Rachel Dudok, Kerri Sanders

Bredel Veterinary Clinic: Dr. Jessy Vandevender, Sarah Maust, Stacey Hershman, Courtney Lowery

Does My Pet Have A Food Allergy?

Sarah Myers

Pets can be vulnerable to food allergies just like humans.

 Does your dog constantly have ear infections? Has he been scratching his sides until they’re bald? Does he chew on his paws?

If your pet is experiencing any of these symptoms, it could be a food allergy. Be sure to note, though, only about 10-15% of allergic reactions are caused by food. The majority of allergies are flea or environmental allergies.

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What Common Human Medications Are Dangerous for Pets?

Sarah Myers

It is difficult to see our pets suffer in pain. While there are some human medications that our pets can have, there are some common medications, both over-the-counter and prescription, that are extremely dangerous for pets. Before considering giving your pet any human treatment, it is important to contact Dr. Jessy at HART Bredel Veterinary Clinic to determine if the medicine is safe. 

Here is a short list of medications that are dangerous for your pet:

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How Do I Care for My Pet’s Teeth?

Sarah Myers

Just like for humans, dental care is an essential part of a pet’s overall health. Issues with a pet’s mouth and teeth can be caused by either obvious or underlying diseases and conditions that your pet may have. Dental issues can also cause deterioration of a pet’s health if not taken care of properly. Your pet should visit the Bredel Veterinary Clinic at HART for veterinary dentistry in order to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

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MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AWARDS 2019 SPAY/NEUTER GRANT TO HART FOR ANIMALS

Paula Yudelevit

Vet Tech, Stacey Hershman and Dr. Jessy Vandevender, with Chi.

Vet Tech, Stacey Hershman and Dr. Jessy Vandevender, with Chi.

HART for Animals was awarded a 2019 grant by the Maryland Department of Agriculture as part of their Spay and Neuter Program designed to reduce the number of unwanted cats and dogs euthanized in shelters across the state. This is the fifth year in which HART has been awarded the grant and, to date has provided 2,123 no-cost spay/neuter surgeries to low-income Maryland residents in Garrett and Allegany Counties. This year’s grant will enable HART’s Lifesaver program to perform 85 dog spays, 128 cat spays, 85 dog neuters and 127 cat neuters. Residents who meet the income-eligibility requirements for Lifesaver can begin to schedule appointments now for 2019. To do so, please call 301.387.7729.

The Maryland Spay/Neuter Program was conceived and initiated by Maryland Votes for Animals (MVFA), and implemented in accordance with the recommendations of a task force created by an act of the Maryland General Assembly in 2011. The task force’s report detailed that 50% of the cats and 33% of the dogs in Maryland’s shelter populations were being euthanized at a tremendous cost to Maryland taxpayers.

The bill to develop the state Spay and Neuter Grants Program became law in 2013. The objective of the program was to provide affordable spay and neuter services throughout the state in order to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia rates. Funding for the program is provided from fees paid by the pet food industry.

“Spaying and neutering your pet does matter,” says Caroline Robison, HART’s Rescue and Adoption Manager. “We all want to reduce the shelter intake and euthanasia rates. But also, 18% of neutered dogs live longer than unneutered dogs, and spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed female dogs, and have less health-related issues” she adds. “Another reason for the reduced lifespan of unaltered pets can be attributed to their increased urge to roam, which exposes them to fights with other animals, getting struck by cars, and other life-threatening situations.”

Dr. Jessy Vandevender, HART’s Bredel Clinic veterinarian, notes that altered pets also have a reduced risk of certain types of cancers. “An unspayed female dog or cat has a greater chance of developing pyometra (a potential fatal uterine infection), uterine cancer and other cancers of the reproductive system.” Male dogs have health issues as well. The doctor adds, “Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male dog helps prevent testicular cancer.”

The effectiveness of HART’s Lifesaver program and its low-cost HARTHelp program has been very positive, says Paula Yudelevit, Executive Director of HART. “HART has been keeping rescue and intake statistics from the Garrett County Animal Shelter since 2003. In 2011, the shelter took in 1,684 animals – the highest number ever – but in 2018, that number dropped to 1,301. The difference lies in the 9,233 animals HART has spayed or neutered through our programs since 2009.”

HART for Animals, Inc. is a charitable animal welfare organization founded in 2003 to improve the condition of homeless animals in the Western Maryland region. HART is a 501 (c) (3) corporation and all donations are tax-deductible. For additional information on HART, the HART Animal Center or any of its programs, or to donate, visit the HART web site at www.hartforanimals.org.

How Do I Prepare My Pet for Boarding?

Sarah Myers

It is great to be able to travel with your pet but what do you do with your furry friend when you can’t take him along? Luckily, HART for Animals offers boarding for your cat(s) and/or dog(s). HART for Animals boasts 25 dog suites with heated floors, doggie doors leading to private patios, cat condos with 3 different levels for sleep and play, a play area with toys, and lots of love and attention. The Bed ‘N Bark Inn at HART is a luxurious place for your pet to stay where he or she will receive the best care possible. So when you are planning a trip out of town, how do you prepare your pet for boarding?

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You Found a Kitten - Now What?

Sarah Myers

You’re going to clear the snow off your driveway so you head out to the shed in your backyard. You open the door, move the snow blower, and you see a tiny kitten that has no collar. What do you do?

First, you should investigate. If the kitten is sleeping peacefully and doesn’t look too dirty or matted, there is a good chance that the mother is nearby and will come back for it. However, if you think the kitten has been lost or abandoned, you may have to intervene.

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Is Cat Vomiting Normal?

Sarah Myers

Many people have probably witnessed their cat vomiting and thought nothing of it besides, “Gross! Hairball!”. Well, be cautious to not simply brush it off if your cat is regularly vomiting. Chronic vomiting in cats is not to be taken lightly and could be the sign of a serious health problem.

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Can I Prevent Osteoarthritis in my Pet?

Sarah Myers

Osteoarthritis is the most conventional type of arthritis in dogs. It actually affects a quarter of the dog population. Osteoarthritis results from loss of articular cartilage that covers and protects the ends of the bones in the joints. New bone formation around the joint can also occur. This is due to the increase of instability and inflammation inside the joints. This is painful for dogs. This disease occurs due to developmental orthopedic diseases affecting the hips, elbow, and stifle. Osteoarthritis can be influenced by genetics, age, bodyweight, gender, exercise, diet, and obesity.

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Whipworms, tapeworms, trichinella, oh my?

Sarah Myers

Intestinal parasites are a common health issue in dogs. Many are familiar with external pests/parasites such as fleas and ticks, but not many people know that intestinal parasites can cause extensive health problems, too. Intestinal parasites live inside your pet’s G.I. tract and include roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms, trichinella, giardia, toxoplasma, and different protozoa.

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Black Tie & Tails: A Benefit for the HART Adoption Wing

Paula Yudelevit

2018 Honorary Chairs, Mercedes & Michael Pellet

2018 Honorary Chairs, Mercedes & Michael Pellet

HART for Animals, with Honorary Chairs, Michael and Mercedes Pellet, will host the “Black Tie & Tails” Gala, to benefit the HART Adoption Programs. The second bi-annual event will take place on Saturday, November 3, 2018, at the Lodge at Wisp Resort. The Gala will feature dinner, dancing and a silent auction that features national and international luxury trips. Proceeds from the Gala will provide funds to keep homeless pets in a safe place while waiting for their forever homes.

“The Gala will be a tremendous help by raising funds for the homeless and abused animals in our area,” says Kelli Palamar, President of HART. “We have found homes for 791 dogs and cats since opening the wing. It’s an honor to have the Pellets as our honorary chairs.”

Since 2009, Michael and Mercedes have worked tirelessly for the homeless animals. “The HART Animal Center would not be here if not for the tenacity and drive of this selfless couple,” says Paula Yudelevit, Executive Director. “They are truly the heart of HART and a blessing to the people and the animals of Garrett County.” The Pellets moved to the county permanently in 2006 with the expectation of retiring. After seeing the need for a facility to help lower the high euthanasia rate in the county, the former business owners began a capital campaign to build a center where homeless cats and dogs, as well as potential adopters, could feel at home. The Pellets have worked full-time pro bono. Mercedes is the Development Director and Treasurer, and Michael is the Facility Manager and past President.

The décor of the “Black Tie & Tails” Gala will have a silver and gold harvest theme. “You won’t see cornucopia,” says décor chair, Meg Collins. Silver and gold pumpkins, mood lighting and up-dated harvest glam will be the style of the evening!” Farmhouse Fete owner, Leigh Clarke, will be providing many of the decorations from her party-planning collection. Food chair, Ann Horton, is working with Wisp Resort on the dinner menu.

“A gala of this magnitude could not happen without the generosity of our sponsors,” says Paula Yudelevit. The sponsors to-date include: Drs. Pat & Sue Bredel, The Squires Group, Dick & Deb Alderson, Wisp Resort, Susan & John Pucciano, Fragasso Financial Advisors, Farmhouse Fete, Ann Smith, First United Bank, Dr. & Mrs. Melissa Walch, BB&T Mortgage, Russell Bounds, Neil & Cynthia Whitton, Ace’s Run Restaurant, Exelon Generation, Rob Michael, Nu-Way Interiors, Bill’s Marine Service, Jared & Laura Fike, Deep Creek Dog, Garrett Container Systems, Steve & Amy Bortz and John & Shelia McCracken,”

HART’s charitable programs include: animal rescue, adoption and sheltering, low-cost, and no-cost spay/neutering, veterinary care, and behavior modification. The monthly cost to care for 50 or more cats and dogs awaiting adoption is $20,000, with adoption fees covering only a portion of their veterinary care. It is through donations, sponsorships, grants, and fundraising opportunities that HART can sustain the Adoption Wing operation.

Tickets to the “Black Tie & Tails” Gala are available online at www.hartforanimals.org, at the HART Animal Center, or by phone at 301.387.7729.

For more information on a sponsorship opportunity to help support the Gala and HART, please call or email Paula Yudelevit, at 301.387.7729 or paula@hartforanimals.org.

A PAWSITIVE PALS FUNDRAISER SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

Paula Yudelevit

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Simon Pearce, located at 265 Glass Drive in Oakland, MD, is holding a very special fundraiser this Saturday for HART for Animals. If you are in need of a special gift to mark a special occasion or are just looking for a beautiful glass addition to your home, go to Simon Pearce on Saturday, August 18, starting at 10:00 AM, and 10% of all sales will be donated to HART for Animals. Thank you...and the adoptable animals thank you, too!

Deep Creek Lake Art, Wine & Beer Festival

Paula Yudelevit

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14th Annual Deep Creek Lake Art, Wine & Beer Festival – September 8, 2018

Click here for festival website

The Deep Creek Lake Art, Wine & Beer Festival returns on Saturday, September 8 to McHenry, MD with two added features: a craft beer tent and a football lounge. The festival is from noon to 6:00 pm at the Garrett County Fairgrounds.

The festival, held as a benefit for HART for Animals and the Garrett Lakes Arts Festival (GLAF), begins Friday, September 7, with pre-fix wine pairing dinners at local restaurants surrounding Deep Creek Lake and the nearby vicinity. The popular dinners pair appetizers, entrees, and desserts with wines from Maryland, as well as wines throughout the United States. Menus for the dinners are posted on the event’s website at www.deepcreekwinefest.com.

More than 200 Maryland and national wines and twenty craft beers will be available for tasting. In addition, a selection of premium wines will be available for tasting in the Premium Wine Tasting Area. For an additional cost, guests will enjoy highly rated and estate-bottled wines, along with hors d’oeuvres in a private area in the Exhibit Hall.

The new craft beer tent will be located in the parking lot adjacent to the Exhibit Hall. Local, regional and national small craft beers will be available for tasting. The beers may also be purchased in the Wine & Beer Store, located in the Exhibit Hall.

Guests can also watch the college game of the week on a big screen TV in the new Mountain State Brewing Company/The Stogie Company Football Lounge. Ice cold tap beer will be on sale in the lounge and the Stogie Company will be offering their cigars in the Cigar tent immediately outside the lounge area.

Guests will also enjoy works by 40 local and regional artisans.  Jewelry, pottery, oil paintings, hand crafted wood work and more will be featured. Food artisans include handcrafted cheeses, pasta, biscotti and other delectable food items.

“We are really excited about the newest additions to the festival” says co-chair Paula Yudelevit. “Now those that don’t drink wine can enjoy some great craft beers. And the new football lounge with beer and cigars is going to be a huge hit! Plus, the fairgrounds are a perfect location too – a very laid-back, grass-roots atmosphere.”

An online program for smart phones and other mobile devices allows patrons to view the wines and save their selections to a Favorite page will be available on Saturday at the event.

Advance tickets to the festival are $30 (which includes a service charge) online at www.deepcreekwinefest.com, and $35 at the entrance to the festival on Saturday, September 8. The cost includes entry to the festival, unlimited wine tasting, beer tasting, and a commemorative glass. Under 21 and entry only is $12 per person. 12 and under are admitted free. The Premium Wine Tasting Area is $30 per person and includes ten wine tasting tickets. Guests may purchase the premium wines in the main wine store. Guests must have an adult festival wrist band for admittance.

Art & Wine Festival lodging packages are available at participating hotels, B&Bs and resort rental agencies. The package includes entrance to the festival, wine tastings, a commemorative wine glass and lodging.

“A special thank you needs to go to our amazing sponsors,” notes festival co-chair Mary Callis. Sponsors include McHenry Beverage, Taylor Made Vacations & Real Estate, Mountain State Brewing Company, The Stogie Company, Simon Pearce, Oakland Oil & Propane, Arrowhead Market, Taco Bell, My Bank! First United, Shop ‘n Save, Little Mountain Promotions, NuWay Interiors, Deepcreektimes.com, Piet & Rosie Versteegen, Lake-Front Magazine, BB&T, and Archie’s.

“The festival could not be successful without an amazing committee,” says Paula. Mary agrees. “These volunteers put hundreds of hours into this event; a few have even worked on this since its inception.” The 2018 committee includes Mary and Paula as co-chairs, Eric Robison, Andy McKenzie, Michael Pellet, Ken Carbone, Judy Carbone, Ken Korando, Betty Ellington, Erin Croake, Tom Hertz, Jan Russell, Sue Arnson, Jimmy Flanigan, Joe Refosco, Rachel Dudok, Kelli Palamar, Lilian Steele, and Debbie Archer.

 

 

 

MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AWARDS 2018 SPAY/NEUTER GRANT TO HART FOR ANIMALS

Paula Yudelevit

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HART for Animals was awarded a 2018 grant by the Maryland Department of Agriculture as part of their Spay and Neuter Program designed to reduce the number of unwanted cats and dogs euthanized in shelters across the state. This is the fourth year in which HART has been awarded the grant and, to date has provided 1,618 no-cost spay/neuter surgeries to low-income Maryland residents in Garrett and Allegany Counties. This year’s grant will enable HART’s Lifesaver program to perform 150 dog spays, 150 cat spays, 100 dog neuters and 100 cat neuters. Residents who meet the income-eligibility requirements for Lifesaver can begin to schedule appointments now for 2018. To do so, please call 301.387.7729.

 The Maryland Spay/Neuter Program was conceived and initiated by Maryland Votes for Animals (MVFA), and implemented in accordance with the recommendations of a task force created by an act of the Maryland General Assembly in 2011. The task force’s report detailed that 50% of the cats and 33% of the dogs in Maryland’s shelter populations were being euthanized at a tremendous cost to Maryland taxpayers.

 The bill to develop the state Spay and Neuter Grants Program became law in 2013. The objective of the program was to provide affordable spay and neuter services throughout the state in order to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia rates. Funding for the program is provided from fees paid by the pet food industry. Currently, there are two other states implementing this program, Maine and HART’s sister state of West Virginia. New Mexico is currently working to implement a similar program.

“It’s important to understand why spaying and neutering your pet matters,” says Caroline Robison, HART’s Rescue and Adoption Manager. “Of course, the main reason is to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia rates. But, 18% of neutered dogs live longer than unneutered dogs, and spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed female dogs,” she adds. “Part of the reduced lifespan of unaltered pets can be attributed to their increased urge to roam, which exposes them to fights with other animals, getting struck by cars, and other calamities.”

 Dr. Vandevender, HART’s Bredel Clinic veterinarian, notes that altered pets also have a reduced risk of certain types of cancers. “An unspayed female dog or cat has a greater chance of developing pyometra (a potential fatal uterine infection), uterine cancer and other cancers of the reproductive system.” Male dogs have health issues as well. The doctor adds, “Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male dog helps prevent testicular cancer.”

 The effectiveness of HART’s Lifesaver program and its low-cost HARTHelp program has been very positive, says Paula Yudelevit, Executive Director of HART. “With the cooperation of the Garrett County Shelter, HART has been keeping rescue and intake statistics since 2003. In 2011, the shelter took in 1,684 animals – the highest number ever – but in 2017, that number dropped to 1,447. The difference lies in the 8,539 animals HART has spayed or neutered since 2009.”

 HART for Animals, Inc. is a charitable animal welfare organization founded in 2003 to improve the condition of homeless animals in the Western Maryland region. HART is a 501 (c) (3) corporation and all donations are tax-deductible. For additional information on HART, the HART Animal Center or any of its programs, or to donate, visit the HART web site at www.hartforanimals.org.

 

HART Receives “Neil’s Helping Fund” Grant from the Banfield Foundation

Paula Yudelevit

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HART for Animals has received a $5,000 grant from the Banfield Foundation that will be used for the emergency care of pets to owners who qualify, regardless of residency. “Neil’s Helping Fund” helps pet owners whose income exceeds the WIC guidelines by a maximum of $10,000 a year. The fund is named in honor of Neil, the clinic’s resident cat, who was a HART rescue.

“Neil’s Helping Fund” is available to any pet needing emergency care, up to $1,000, whose owner meets the eligibility requirements. Life threatening care such as an obstruction, broken bones, stitches, poison, Parvo, etc., will be treated and covered under the grant. Terminal illnesses, pre-existing conditions, and chronic ailments are not included. Other exclusions apply such as vaccines, flea/tick medications, preventative care, and refills on initial prescriptions. Follow-up appointments for the emergency are included.

 “Unlike ‘Mocha’s Fund,’ HART’s program that covers emergencies for rescued pets, ‘Neil’s Helping Fund’ is specifically for pets from families that may not have the money to pay when their beloved dog or cat is seriously injured or needs emergency care,” says HART’s Bredel Clinic veterinarian, Dr. Jessy Vandevender. “This grant gives us the resources we need to help more pet owners in our community.”

When an emergency does arise, pet owners are asked to call HART immediately at 301.387.7729. Once at the clinic, a written estimate will be provided for the client to review. The client will complete an application and will be required to show proof of income.

The Banfield Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and believes that all pets deserve access to veterinary care. In support of this belief, the foundation funds programs that enable veterinary care, elevate the power of the human-animal bond, provide disaster relief for pets, and advance the science of veterinary medicine through fostering innovation and education.

Click here for application

 

“PENNHIP” TESTING FOR DOGS NOW AVAILABLE AT HART

Paula Yudelevit

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The Bredel Veterinary Clinic will now offer PennHip testing at the HART Animal Center. PennHip is an advanced hip-screening process that can help prevent or lessen the severity of hip dysplasia in dogs. The procedure is performed by Jessy Vandevender, DVM, who is PennHIP certified. The screening tool measures joint laxity (looseness) of the hips through a series of three radiographs.

The PennHIP method has strong scientific foundation as the most effective hip-screening tool available for all dogs. For pet dogs found to be at risk, early intervention can help make a difference in their long-term health. For working or service dogs, identifying healthy hips can extend their working life. For breeding dogs, early detection of at-risk hips can allow the breeder to make early, informed decisions as to which dogs to keep in breeding programs. Unlike the standard Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) hip-joint scoring system, which is diagnostic, PennHIP is predictive and can be done as early as 16 weeks.

For more information on PennHIP procedures or to schedule an evaluation, please call the HART Animal Center at 301-387-7729.

 

Thirteen Years of Art & Wine: The History of the Deep Creek Lake Art & Wine Festival

Paula Yudelevit

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Thirteen years ago, the newly formed Marketing Roundtable for the Garrett County Chamber, was given the task of developing an attraction that would increase county visitation, sales and accommodations after Labor Day.  After debating several possibilities, the committee began researching wine festivals as a vehicle to achieve our mission of putting “heads on beds.”  Because of the success of these events in other regions, the Deep Creek Lake Art & Wine Festival was born. Volunteers and resources were needed to execute an event of this magnitude, so the Marketing Roundtable solicited nonprofit organizations to act as the beneficiary and provide support where needed.

The Marketing Roundtable formed a second committee specifically for the purpose of managing and coordinating the Art & Wine Festival. In its first two years, the Chamber was instrumental in providing monetary and marketing support to the event. After the second year, the committee became self-supporting by retaining a small amount of the profits before presenting the beneficiary with their donation. 

The first year was challenging. The location of the festival was originally planned on the grounds of Fantasy Valley, a restaurant leased at the time by Ruth & Wendell Beitzel. “After submitting our application for the one Wine Festival license granted each year in Garrett County, a group of us from the committee went to the liquor board hearing ready to receive the license,” says Paula Yudelevit, co-founder and co-chair of the festival. “We anticipated a 30 minute conversation at the maximum – it turned out to be almost 2 hours!”  What the festival committee didn’t know was that, while the applicant must have a liquor license, the actual event cannot be held on their property. After months of planning, and with the advertising materials ready to print, the committee stood outside the courthouse to find a new venue. “I remember one of our members calling a person on the Fair board to see is the Garrett County fairground was available. It was.”

The next question was if the festival could serve and sell alcohol. Fortunately, that was a yes too.

With a committee of business leaders, and a group of volunteers, the Deep Creek Lake Art & Wine Festival gates opened as scheduled in September of 2005.

“We had hoped for 500 people the first year,” says co-founder and co-chair, Vianne Bell. “We ended up with 800! There was so much we didn’t anticipate or even think of! Wine buckets had to be emptied, water pitchers constantly refilled, crackers replenished. We had to leave the event to buy more crackers. And beg for ice from Wisp and Burger King!”

Today, wine is conveniently sold in the wine store, located in the Exhibit Hall. The first year, the wine was sold out of the window of the fair board’s original office. “We had wine stacked around us, with a cash box and an old-fashioned credit card machine,” Vianne continues. “Paula and I swore we wouldn’t do it again.” The event netted $11,000 and was such a success that Vianne went on for another 9 years. Paula, Executive Director of HART for Animals is still co-chairing, along with Mary Callis, Executive Director of Garrett Lakes Arts Festival (GLAF).

“For the first eight years, the beneficiary of the festival was a national nonprofit organization,” says Mary Callis. “In its ninth year, the committee opted to change the beneficiary due to a major reorganization of the original charity.” When the opportunity came along, HART and GLAF submitted a joint proposal to become the beneficiaries. “As two local nonprofits, the proceeds now stay in the county,” continues Mary. “We also have booths available for five or six local nonprofits so they too have the opportunity to benefit from the large crowds.” Over the past four years, the festival has raised more than $200,000 for the two organizations.

The Deep Creek Lake Art & Wine Festival has come a long way in the last 12 years. It is one of the top events in the county. With consistent growth, approximately 2,800 people come each year to taste over 200 regional, national and international wines, peruse the 40-plus artisan booths, listen to live entertainment, purchase wines to take home, bid on silent auction items, and have a fun time with friends. “More people mean more volunteers,” says volunteer chair, Judy Carbone. “In addition to Garrett College’s 80-plus athletes, we have about 70 guest pourers and another 50 or so at the front gate, as cashiers, and general helpers.”

“The festival could not be successful without an amazing committee,” says Paula. Mary agrees. “These volunteers put hundreds of hours into this event; a few have worked on this since its inception.” The 2017 committee includes Mary and Paula as co-chairs, Sam Housley, Andy McKenzie, Michael Pellet, Ken Carbone, Judy Carbone, Ken Korando, Betty Ellington, Erin Croake, Tom Hertz, Lori Zagola, Sue Arnson, Jimmy Flanigan, Joe Refosco, Lilian Steele, and Debbie Archer.

A few changes have occurred over the years, keeping the festival fun and appealing to the wine-lovers. A Premium Wine area was added several years ago to accommodate those looking for high-end varieties. The wine tasting glasses have taken a colorful twist, with the stem color changing year-to-year, making them a “must-have” collectible. The Friday night wine pairing dinners at local restaurants have evolved to include winery representatives introducing wines paired with specially prepared dinner courses.

The 13th annual Art & Wine Festival takes place Saturday, September 9, from noon to 6 pm (wine store remains open until 7 pm). Tickets for the festival are $35 (buy online in advance at http://www.deepcreekwinefest.com/tickets and receive $5 off each ticket) for adults 21 and over and include entry fee, commemorative wine glass and unlimited wine tasting. Admittance only is $12 and children 12 and under are free. Discounts are available for groups of 20 or more. Please call 866.635.3560 for prices.

Festival lodging packages are available at participating resort rental agencies, including Taylor Made Vacation Rentals, Coldwell Banker Resort Rentals, and Railey Mountain Lake Vacations.

This year’s festival is sponsored in part by local and regional businesses that include McHenry Beverage Shop, Taylor Made Vacations and Real Estate, BB&T, Taco Bell, Arrowhead Deli, Mountain State Brewing Co., Vacation Surfing, Railey Mountain Lake Vacations, Shop 'N Save, Schoolhouse Earth, My Bank! First United, RBC Wealth Management, Pepsi Cola, American Metro, Little Mountain Promotions, DeepCreekTimes.com, NuWay Interiors, Piet & Rosie Versteegen, Lake-Front Magazine, and Archies.

“SKYHOUNDZ” WORLD QUALIFYING CLASSIC RETURNS TO ACCIDENT

Paula Yudelevit

Frank Montgomery with his rescued Jack Russell Terrier, Bentley

Frank Montgomery with his rescued Jack Russell Terrier, Bentley

The “Skyhoundz” Classic World Canine Disc Championship Series, which is the largest disc-dog series in the world, returns on Saturday and Sunday, July 29th and 30th at the Lions Club Ball Park, adjacent to the HART Animal Center, on Bumble Bee Road, in Accident, Maryland. The two-day event will feature approximately 45-50 teams competing in various qualifying events. The proceeds of the event will benefit HART for Animals.  

The “Skyhoundz” Series consists of Distance and Accuracy disc competition, using one disc; freestyle choreographed routines set to music, using up to five discs, performing a variety of tricks and maneuvers; and pairs freestyle, choreographed routines set to music and using up to ten discs, performing a variety of tricks and maneuvers.

Competitors may register for six classes of events, from youth and novice to master and expert. Registration forms are available online at    www.mad-dogs.org. Registration at the event begins at 8:30 am on Saturday. The competition begins immediately after registration.

MAD Dogs (The Mid-Atlantic Disc Dog Club), is hosting the “Skyhoundz” Classic. The regional club supports all K9 Disc Enthusiasts and Spectators alike. Their focus is competitive fun, welcoming all new members, both human and canine, at all competition levels.

MAD Dogs encourages all canine lovers and their furry friends, through hosting events that are fun, well run, competitive, varied, and promote good sportsmanship. The year 2017 marks the 43rd consecutive year of competitive canine disc sports.